Untitled
cinephiliabeyond:

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s grave, Powązki Cemetery, Warsaw. Thanks to K. Thomas Kahn.

There are mysteries, secret zones in each individual. —Krzysztof Kieślowski

On March 13, 1996, the self-effacing Polish film maker, Krzysztof Kieślowski, died of heart failure in a Warsaw hospital. The film world mourned, especially when it was revealed that Kieślowski, who had been retired since the completion of Red in 1994, was contemplating a return to work with a new trilogy of films about heaven, hell, and limbo. What we are left with in the wake of the director’s passing, however is an extraordinary résumé that includes such memorable features as Camera Buff, Decalogue, The Double Life of Veronique, and the Three Colors trilogy (Blue, White, Red). Less than a year before his death, Kieślowski, agreed to be the subject of a short documentary by his long-time assistant, Krzysztof Wierzbicki. The hour long film, which was made for Danish television, featured Kieślowski’s recollections of his life and movies, along with several candid shots of the director relaxing and enjoying his retirement. What was initially intended as a fairly inconsequential interview unwittingly turned into a remarkable tribute. 

The title comes from Kieślowski’s belief that people should not lie about how they’re feeling just for the sake of polite conversation. As a result, when someone asks him how he’s doing, instead of replying “Well” or “Very well”, he says “I’m so-so.” In truth, however, there’s nothing “so-so” about this particular motion picture. Krzysztof Kieślowski: I’m So-So is a striking picture of an extraordinary man who made some of the most powerful films of the last two decades. This movie will live alongside the director’s body of work as an important and informative companion piece. —James Berardinelli

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s grave, Powązki Cemetery, Warsaw. Thanks to K. Thomas Kahn.

There are mysteries, secret zones in each individual.Krzysztof Kieślowski

On March 13, 1996, the self-effacing Polish film maker, Krzysztof Kieślowski, died of heart failure in a Warsaw hospital. The film world mourned, especially when it was revealed that Kieślowski, who had been retired since the completion of Red in 1994, was contemplating a return to work with a new trilogy of films about heaven, hell, and limbo. What we are left with in the wake of the director’s passing, however is an extraordinary résumé that includes such memorable features as Camera Buff, Decalogue, The Double Life of Veronique, and the Three Colors trilogy (Blue, White, Red). Less than a year before his death, Kieślowski, agreed to be the subject of a short documentary by his long-time assistant, Krzysztof Wierzbicki. The hour long film, which was made for Danish television, featured Kieślowski’s recollections of his life and movies, along with several candid shots of the director relaxing and enjoying his retirement. What was initially intended as a fairly inconsequential interview unwittingly turned into a remarkable tribute.

The title comes from Kieślowski’s belief that people should not lie about how they’re feeling just for the sake of polite conversation. As a result, when someone asks him how he’s doing, instead of replying “Well” or “Very well”, he says “I’m so-so.” In truth, however, there’s nothing “so-so” about this particular motion picture. Krzysztof Kieślowski: I’m So-So is a striking picture of an extraordinary man who made some of the most powerful films of the last two decades. This movie will live alongside the director’s body of work as an important and informative companion piece.James Berardinelli

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

asylum-art:

10 First-World Anarchists Who Don’t Care About Your Rules 

The world relies on rules and regulations to run in an orderly fashion. But there’s a few people out there who are rebels. They won’t follow your rules – they’re their own masters. This post is for the first-world anarchists – the revolutionaries who don’t care about your rules.

asylum-art:

10 First-World Anarchists Who Don’t Care About Your Rules 

The world relies on rules and regulations to run in an orderly fashion. But there’s a few people out there who are rebels. They won’t follow your rules – they’re their own masters. This post is for the first-world anarchists – the revolutionaries who don’t care about your rules.

23rd-block:

Carel Fabricius, The Goldfinch, 1654.

23rd-block:

Carel Fabricius, The Goldfinch, 1654.


Regine Ramseier, a German artist, had the great idea to created a ‘Dandelion Ceiling.’ 2000 dandelion flowers were treated and sprayed with a gentle adhesive to fix them. The dandelions were then transported by car to a little white room where they were hung.

Regine Ramseier, a German artist, had the great idea to created a ‘Dandelion Ceiling.’ 2000 dandelion flowers were treated and sprayed with a gentle adhesive to fix them. The dandelions were then transported by car to a little white room where they were hung.

poetrysince1912:


The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill   
of things unknown   
but longed for still   
and his tune is heard   
on the distant hill   
for the caged bird   
sings of freedom.



RIP Maya Angelou
http://bit.ly/1mFEnQE 

poetrysince1912:

The caged bird sings

with a fearful trill   

of things unknown   

but longed for still   

and his tune is heard   

on the distant hill   

for the caged bird   

sings of freedom.

engineeringhistory:

IBM 64 KB RAM, first demonstrated in 1975 and mass produced in 1977.

engineeringhistory:

IBM 64 KB RAM, first demonstrated in 1975 and mass produced in 1977.

crookedindifference:

What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?

Neil deGrasse Tyson, PhD: The most astounding fact… is the knowledge that the atoms that comprise life on Earth, the atoms that make up the human body, are traceable to the crucibles that cooked light elements into heavy elements in their core under extreme temperatures and pressures. These stars, the high mass ones among them went unstable in their later years they collapsed and then exploded scattering their enriched guts across the galaxy. Guts made of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and all the fundamental ingredients of life itself. These ingredients become part of gas cloud that condense, collapse, form the next generation of solar systems… stars with orbiting planets, and those planets now have the ingredients for life itself.

So that when I look up at the night sky and I know that yes, we are part of this universe, we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the universe is in us.

When I reflect on that fact, I look up – many people feel small because they’re small and the universe is big – but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars. There’s a level of connectivity. That’s really what you want in life, you want to feel connected, you want to feel relevant, you want to feel like a participant in the goings-on of activities and events around you. That’s precisely what we are, just by being alive…